Woodcache PBC

Our Blog

Musings, updates, and occasional long-form articles from our team.

Carbon Accounting
Whit Childs

Keep CDR Quality High

Hello Woodcachers, it is great to get on this blog and meet you. My name is Whit Childs, and I am the Chief Revenue Officer

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Gettin’ Traction

Every leader, founder, entrepreneur, and CEO knows how important it is to raise money. In importance, it sits just behind building a solid team and

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Climate Science

A Plea to Weather Presenters

Presenters should strengthen the link between extreme weather events and climate change.

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Biomass Burial

You Should Care About Carbon Margins

This is part of a series in which I badger the CDR industry into taking Woody Biomass Storage (WBS) more seriously.  Today I describe why
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Biomass Burial

Woody Biomass Storage vs. Kontiki Biochar

Statistician George Box famously stated “All models are wrong but some are useful.”  I present here a simplified (read, “wrong”) model intended to contextualize the
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Uncategorized

You’re thinking About Durability Wrong

The thought process around durability should be about keeping as much greenhouse gas (ghg) out of the air as long as possible.  This should be
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Biomass Burial

The Time Value of Emissions Should Be a Thing

We should agree that a unit of carbon emissions today is worse than the same unit of carbon emissions in the future, especially the distant
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Carbon Accounting

Keep CDR Quality High

Hello Woodcachers, it is great to get on this blog and meet you. My name is Whit Childs, and I am the Chief Revenue Officer
Read More →

Project WOCO is Complete!

Decomposition of Forest Products Buried in Landfills

Key Takeaways

  • More lignified materials exhibit less anaerobic degradation in landfills.
  • No significant degradation was observed in wood samples, with the exception of oriented strand board (OSB) and Red Oak.
  • The carbon conversion of wood under landfill conditions is well below the recommended assumption in the 2006 IPCC Guidance.

Wood Biodegradation in Laboratory-Scale Landfills

Key Takeaways:

  • There was a significant difference in methane generation between hardwood and softwood species, even though cellulose concentrations were similar.
  • This may be because lignin polymers in hardwood species have lower structural integrity and are typically more easily degraded in chemical processes than softwood lignin.
  • Hardwoods contain both syringyl and guaiacl lignin units, while softwoods contain only guaiacyl lignin.

Understanding the Utilization of Woody Biomass Through the Perspectives of Southwest United States Forest Service Land Managers: A Qualitative Study

Key Takeaways:

  • Land managers expressed anxiety about accelerating the pace and scale of forest restoration, with one respondent noting “honestly, we are on borrowed time.”
  • The primary objectives noted by respondents were to reduce hazard fuels (60% of respondents) and protect/promote habitat for wildlife (50% of respondents).
  • Respondents expressed that “if a market were available to take woody biomass material, they would. almost always use it.”

Wood Waste Utilization Assessment for the Greater Taos, New Mexico Region

Key Takeaways:

  • 27,876 bone dry tonnes (BDT) of biomass was economically available within 50 miles of Taos, NM, at a delivered cost of between $36.25-51.25/BDT
  • The authors estimate that forest restoration activities generate 6 BDT of woody biomass per acre treated for pinyon-juniper forests, and an average of 8.5 BDT per acre treated for mixed conifer and ponderosa pine.
  • Treating 15-20,000 acres of woodlands would generate 120,000 BDT of woody biomass. There are 3,026,412 acres of woodlands in the survey area, implying a total of 18.2 Million BDT available within 50 acres of Taos, NM.

Sustainable Wood Procurement: What the Literature Tells Us

Key Takeaways:

  • The cost of forest fuel reduction treatments ranged from $620/acre to $1,627/acre.
  • Using a cut-to-length logging system to harvest biomass in Arizona produced costs that were nearly 11 times those for sawlog harvests.
  • Integrating biomass harvesting with logging operations led to costs that were 35% lower per tonne of woody biomass.

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Removals From Forest Land, Woodlands, and Urban Trees in the United States, 1990-2018

Key Takeaways:

  • Forest land, harvested wood products, and urban trees collectively represent the largest carbon sink in the United States, offsetting more than 11% of national GHG emissions.
  • Roughly 2.7 billion metric tonnes of dead wood are estimated to be present in forests.
  • Forested lands in Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming are among the few that do not sequester C02 on a net basis.

A Large and Persistent Carbon Sink in the World’s Forests

Key Takeaways:

  • Forests in the western united states have shown considerably increased mortality related to drought stress, insects, and fires.
  • There was a large carbon sink increase in boreal deadwood caused by natural disturbances in Siberia and Canada.
  • Warmer winters in boreal regions reduce the forest sink through suppressed gross primary production, increased fires, and increased insect damage.